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How the Impacts of Intimate Partner Domestic Violence or Aggression, Spanking, and Depression on Child Aggression vary by age

How the Impacts of Intimate Partner Domestic Violence or Aggression,  Spanking, and Depression on Child Aggression vary by age

Name:
Hua Lin

Department:
Human Development and Family Science

Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to examine whether the interaction of intimate partner domestic violence or aggression (IPDVA) with spanking and the interaction of IPDVA with depression influence children’s aggressive behaviors, especially in the unmarried parent cohort. It also investigates whether the effect of IPDVA, spanking, and depression on child aggressive behaviors vary by child age. Participants are unwed parents with children born from 1998 to 2000 from 20 large cities of the Unites States, data collected in the Fragile Family and Child Well-being Study (FFCW) data set. Measures are IPDVA, spanking, depression, child age, and child aggressive behaviors, using data collected in three time points: when children’s ages are 3, 5, and 9. The results indicate that, after controlling gender, maternal education and poverty ratio, IPDVA, spanking, and maternal depression significantly predict child aggression. Also, IPDVA and depression have interactional effect on child aggression. Third, children at same age, being less spanked will have less aggressive behaviors that being more spanked. With child growing up, the effect of spanking on child aggression decreases. In addiction, children at same age, living with mother suffering and type of IPDVA are more aggressive that children living with mother not suffering any time of IPDVA. When children grow up, those children with mother not suffering any type of IPDVA will have faster decrease in aggression behaviors than those children with mother suffering any type of IPDVA.